upcoming lectures this term

‘200 Years of the Elgin Marbles’
by Dr Ian Jenkins OBE FSA

Dr Ian Jenkins, OBE, is responsible for the ancient Greek collections at the British Museum where he has worked since 1978. He has published widely on the archaeology and art history, restoration and conservation history of the Museum collections. His special interests include Greek architecture and sculpture, Ancient Greek social history, plaster casts after the antique and the collections of prints and drawings in the Department. He was responsible for the recent major exhibition ‘Defining Beauty- the body in Ancient Greek Art’ which received critical acclaim.

The acquisition of the Elgin Marbles by the British Museum in 1816 is arguably the most important single event in the history of the British Museum. For two centuries the sculptures have been at the heart of the Museum’s purpose. During that time the presentation of them has undergone many changes. This lecture will review how the display of the sculptures has responded to changes in their understanding.

Date:     Tuesday 15 March 2016

Time:    7.30pm

Venue:  Erskine May Hall

Cost:     Admission Free

 

 

previous lectures this term

‘Impossible Art’
by Alex Chinneck

Alex Chinneck is a British sculptor who lives and works in London. At only thirty years of age the artist is the youngest Board member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors and has already realised a succession of major public artworks that have captured international admiration and attention. These include: sliding the entire brick facade from a house into the front garden of the property; completely inverting two four-storey commercial buildings; constructing a full-size house from 7,500 wax bricks that proceeded to melt over 45 days; and creating the illusion that a stone building on London’s iconic Covent Garden Piazza had miraculously levitated into the air. The artist has recently completed the landmark project for the London Design Festival 2015; his biggest undertaking to date. 

Date:     Thursday 28 January 2016

Time:    7.30pm

Venue:  Erskine May Hall

Cost:     Admission Free

 

‘What is classic about classical art?’

by Dr Caroline Vout

Gardens, galleries and parks across Europe are peopled by bronze and marble figures that are unimaginable without Greek and Roman sculpture. Modernism notwithstanding, artists are still reinterpreting this sculpture today. How did Greek and Roman sculpture come to have this status? This lecture looks at how artefacts imagined first in the ancient Greek world, and often erected in sacred spaces, came to dictate the western art-historical tradition; how artefacts accrue meanings and values positive and negative as they move from culture to culture, display context to display context, and across time; how some Greek and Roman sculpture became ‘classic(al)’ and ‘art’. It looks at how history shapes what we look at and how art shapes society. 

Date:     Thursday 3 March 2016

Time:    7.30pm

Venue:  Erskine May Hall

Cost:     Admission Free

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